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GLOSSARY

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  • Abrasion Resistance
    The ability of a wire, cable, or material to withstand surface wear.
  • AC
    Or Alternating Current: An electric current that reverses its direction at regularly recurring intervals, e.g., the typical household current.  It is expressed in cycles per second (Hertz (Hz)).
  • Accelerated Aging
    A test that simulates the long-term effects of environmental aging in a comparatively short period of time.
  • Accelerator
    A chemical additive that speeds up a chemical reaction under specific conditions.
  • Admittance
    The measure of the ability of a circuit to conduct an alternating current.  The reciprocal of impedance, measured in siemens or mhos.  Symbol:  Y.
  • Aging
    The change of a material's properties over time under specific conditions.
  • ALTA™
    High temperature, high voltage hookup wire specifically designed by Conductive for heat generating appliances.
  • ALTA™-V
    High temperature, high voltage, VW-1 hookup wire specifically designed by Conductive for heat generating appliances.
  • Alternating Current
    An electric current that reverses its direction at regularly recurring intervals, e.g., the typical household current.  It is expressed in cycles per second (Hertz (Hz)).
  • Ambient Temperature
    The temperature of the surrounding environment; technically, the temperature of the air surrounding a power supply or cooling medium.
  • American Wire Gauge
    The standard system used for designating wire diameter.  The lower the AWG, the larger the diameter.  Also called the Brown and Sharpe (B&S) Wire Gauge.
  • Ampacity
    The amount of current, in amperes, an insulated conductor can carry without exceeding its insulation and jacket temperature ratings.
  • Ampere (Amp)
    Unit of current that is equivalent to the flow of one coulomb per second or to the steady current produced by one volt applied across a resistance of one ohm.  Symbol: A.
  • Ampere's Law
    The magnetic intensity at any point near a current-carrying conductor can be computed on the assumption that each infinitesimal length of the conductor produces at the point an infinitesimal magnetic density. The resulting magnetic intensity at the point is the vector sum of the contributions of all the elements of the conductor.
  • Anneal
    To temper, or relieve mechanical stress through heat and gradual cooling.  Annealing copper renders it less brittle.
  • Annular Conductor
    A number of wires stranded in three reversed concentric layers around a core.
  • ANSI
    Abbreviation for the American National Standards Institute.
  • Anti-Oxidant
    A substance that prevents or slows down oxidation of material exposed to air.
  • Appliance Wire and Cable
    A classification covering insulated wire and cable for internal wiring of appliances and equipment.
  • AQUA-FLEX™
    Submersion & sun resistant cable designed by Conductive specifically for the pool and water treatment industry.
  • ARC-FLEX®
    Thermoset insulated wire for mobile appliances and industrial machinery made by Conductive.
  • Armor
    A braid or wrapping of metal, usually steel, used for mechanical protection.  Generally placed over the outer sheath.
  • Armored Cable
    A cable wrapped in metal for mechanical protection.
  • ASME
    American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
  • ASTA-BEAB
    Approval agency of the United Kingdom.
  • ASTM
    American Society for Testing and Materials, a nonprofit, industry-wide organization which publishes standards, methods of testing, recommended practices, definitions, and other related material.
  • Attenuation
    Power loss in an electrical system.  In cables, attenuation is usually expressed in db per unit length, usually 100 ft.
  • AWG
    Or American Wire Gauge: The standard system used for designating wire diameter.  The lower the AWG, the larger the diameter.  Also called the Brown and Sharpe (B&S) Wire Gauge.
  • AWM
    UL designation for Appliance Wiring Material.
  • Binder
    A spirally-wrapped tape or thread used for holding assembled cable components in place while awaiting subsequent manufacturing operations.
  • Braid
    A fibrous or metallic group of filaments interwoven in cylindrical form to form a covering over one or more wires.
  • Braid Angle
    The smaller of the two angles formed by the shielding strand and the axis of the cable being shielded.
  • Breakdown Voltage
    The voltage at which the insulation between two conductors breaks down.
  • Breakout
    The point at which a conductor or group of conductors branches out from a muliconductor cable or wire harness to complete circuits at various points along the main cable.
  • Building Wire
    Wire rated for 600 volts or less, used for indoor light and power.
  • Bunched Stranding
    A group of strands twisted together in a random manner and in the same direction without regard to the geometric arrangement of specific strands.
  • Bushing
    A lining for an opening, intended to protect wire and cable from abrasion when passing through it.
  • Butt
    Joining of two conductors end-to-end, with no overlap and with the axes in line.
  • Butt Splice
    A splice wherein two wires from opposite ends butt against each other, or against a stop, in the center of the splice.
  • Cable
    An insulated conductor, or group of individually insulated conductors in twisted (round) or parallel (flat) configuration.
  • Cable Assembly
    A completed cable and its associated hardware ready to install.
  • Cable Filler
    Material used to fill a cable, making it round and providing the added strength and conductor spacing needed to support industry standards.
  • Cabling
    The twisting together of two or more insulated conductors to form a cable.
  • Cabling Factor
    Used in the formula for calculating the diameter of an unshielded, unjacketed cable. D = Kd, where D is the cable diameter, K is the factor, and d is the diameter of one insulated conductor.
  • Capacitance
    The ratio of the electrostatic charge on a conductor to the potential difference between the conductors required to maintain that charge.
  • CCC
    Approval agency of China.
  • CEBEC
    Committee for Electrotechnical Belgium European Community, the approval agency of Belgium.
  • CEE
    International Commission on the Rules for the Approval of Electrical Equipment, a European  organization dealing with electrical standards.
  • CENELEC
    European Committee for Electrotechnical Normalization, a European organization dealing with electrical standards.
  • Certicate of Compliance (C of C)
    A written statement, normally generated by a Quality Control Department, which states that the product being shipped meets customer's specifications.
  • Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE)
    Rubbery polymer used for insulation and jacketing of wire and cable.
  • Circuit
    A complete path over which electrons can flow from the negative terminals of a voltage source through parts and wires to the positive terminals of the same voltage source.
  • Circuit Sizes
    A popular term for building wire sizes 14 AWG through 10 AWG.
  • Closed-End Splice
    An insulated splice in which two or more wires overlap and enter the splice from the same end of the barrel.
  • Coaxial Cable
    A cable consisting of two cylindrical conductors with a common axis, separated by a dielectric.
  • Color Coding
    Coloring of the conductors within a cable to define which conductor is line, neutral, and ground. There are two different color codes, one for international and one for North American cable. International (harmonized) and some North American cable use the color code BBG/Y:  Brown (line), Blue (neutral), and Green/Yellow (ground), while other North American cable utilizes the color code BWG: Black (line), White (neutral), and Green (ground).
  • Compact Conductor
    Stranded conductor rolled to deform the round wires to fill the normal gaps between the wires in a strand.
  • Compound
    An insulating or jacketing material made by mixing two or more ingredients.
  • Concentric Stranding
    A strand that consists of a central wire surrounded by one or more layers of helically-wound strands to form a round arrangement.
  • Concentric-Lay Cable
    A multiple conductor cable composed of a central core surrounded by one or more layers of helically-laid insulated conductors.
  • Concentricity
    In a wire or cable, the measurement of the location of the center of the conductor with respect to the geometric center of the surrounding insulation.
  • Conductance
    The ability of a conductor to carry an electric charge.  The ratio of the current flow to the potential difference causing the flow.  The reciprocal of resistance.
  • Conductivity
    The capability of a material to carry electrical current, usually expressed as a percentage of copper conductivity (copper being 100%).
  • Conductor
    An uninsulated wire suitable for carrying electrical current.
  • Conduit
    A tube or trough through which insulated wires and cables are run.
  • Connector
    A device used to physically and electrically connect two or more conductors.
  • Contact
    The part of a connector that actually carries the electrical current and is touched together or separated to control the flow.
  • Continuity Check
    A test to determine whether electrical current flows continuously throughout the length of a single wire in a cable.
  • Cord
    A flexible insulated cable.
  • Cordset
    Portable cord fitted with a wiring device at one or both ends.
  • Corrosion
    The destruction of the surface of a metal by chemical reaction.
  • Covering
    Textile braid or jacket made of rubber, plastics, or other materials applied over wire and cables to provide mechanical protection and identification.
  • Creepage
    The conduction of electricity across the surface of a dielectric.
  • Creepage Path
    The shortest distance between two conducting parts, measured along the surface of the insulating material between them.
  • Crimp
    The act of compressing a connector barrel around a cable in order to make an electrical connection.
  • Crimp Termination
    Connection in which a metal sleeve is secured to a conductor by mechanically crimping the sleeve with pliers, presses or automated crimping machines.
  • Crosslinked
    Inter-molecular bonds between long chain thermoplastic polymers by chemical or electron bombardment means. The properties of the resulting thermosetting material are usually improved.
  • Crosstalk
    Undesired electrical currents in conductors caused by electromagnetic or electrostatic coupling from other conductors or from external sources. Also, leakage of optical power from one optical conductor to another.
  • CSA
    Canadian Standards Association, the approval agency of Canada.
  • Current
    The rate of transfer of electricity. Practical unit is the ampere which represents the transfer of one coulomb per second.  In a simple circuit, current (I) produced by a cell or electromotive force (E) when there is an external resistance (R) and internal resistance (r) is: I = E/(R+r).
  • Current-Carrying Capacity
    Or Ampacity: The amount of current, in amperes, an insulated conductor can carry without exceeding its insulation and jacket temperature ratings.
  • Cycle
    The complete sequence of alternation or reversal of the flow of an alternating electric current.  (See Hertz (Hz)).
  • DC
    Or Direct Current: An electric current which flows in only one direction, most often produced by a battery source.
  • DEMKO
    Approval agency of Denmark.
  • Dielectric
    Any insulating material between two conductors which permits electrostatic attraction and repulsion to take place across it.
  • Dielectric Constant
    The ratio of the capacitance of a condenser with dielectric between the electrodes to the capacitance when air is between the electrodes.  Symbol:  K.
  • Dielectric Strength
    The voltage which an insulation can withstand before breakdown occurs. Usually expressed as a voltage gradient (such as volts per mil).
  • Dielectric Test
    Or Hi-Pot Test: Short for "high potential," a test designed to determine the highest voltage that can be applied to a conductor without breaking through the insulation.
  • Direct Capacitance
    The capacitance measured directly from conductor to conductor through a single insulating layer.
  • Direct Current
    An electric current which flows in only one direction, most often produced by a battery source.
  • Direct Current Resistance (DCR)
    The resistance offered by any circuit to the flow of direct current.
  • Direction of Lay
    The lateral direction in which the strands of a conductor run over the top of the cable conductor as they recede from an observer looking along the axis of the conductor or cable. Also applies to twisted cable.
  • Drain Wire
    In a cable, the uninsulated wire laid over the component or components used as a ground connection.
  • Drawing
    In the manufacture of wire, pulling the metal through a die or series of dies for reduction of diameter to specified size.
  • DRT
    PVC range and dryer cord (CSA).
  • Durometer
    A measurement used to denote the hardness of polymers, elastomers, and rubbers, expressed as a value between 0 and 100, with higher values indicating a harder material.
  • Eccentricity
    Like concentricity, a measure of the center of a conductor’s location with respect to the circular cross section of the insulation. Expressed as a percentage of displacement of one circle within the other.
  • Elastomer
    A rubber or rubber-like material that will repeatedly stretch to 200 percent or more and return rapidly and forcefully to its approximate original shape.
  • Elongation
    The fractional increase in length of a material stressed in tension.
  • EMI
    Abbreviation for electromagnetic interference.
  • EPDM
    Abbreviation for Ethylene-propylene-dene monomer rubber, a material with good electrical insulating properties.
  • EPR
    Abbrevaition for Ethylene-propylene copolymer rubber, a material with good electrical insulating properties.
  • EVO-FLEX®
    Heavy duty cabling solution made by Conductive for industrial appliances and power tools.
  • External Wiring
    Electronic wiring which interconnects subsystems within the system.
  • Extruded Cable
    A cable with conductors that are uniformly insulated and formed by applying a homogeneous insulation material in a continuous extrusion process.
  • Extrusion
    The process of simultaneously forcing a plastic or elastomer and a conductor core through a die, thereby applying a continuous coating of insulation or jacket to the core or conductor.
  • F-1
    POWER-LOK® FlatOne, a high performance flat plug designed by Conductive.
  • Ferrule
    A short tube used to make solder-less connections to shielded or coaxial cable.
  • Filled Cable
    A telephone cable construction in which the cable core is filled with a material that will prevent moisture from entering or passing through the cable.
  • Filler
    Non-conducting material such as jute, plastic strands, or plastic fibers used to endure the cable maintains its circular form during the extrusion process.  It also provides tensile strength to the cable assembly, helping to prevent the cable from over-stretching and strands from being pulled to a breaking point.
  • FIMKO
    Approval agency of Finland.
  • Fine Strand Wire
    Stranded wire with individual strands of 36 AWG or smaller.
  • Flame Resistance
    The ability of a material not to propagate flame once the heat source is removed.
  • Flame Retardance
    Ability of a material to prevent the spread of combustion by a low rate of travel so the flame will not be conveyed.
  • Flammability
    The measure of the material's ability to support combustion.
  • Flat Braid
    A woven braid of tinned copper strands rolled flat at time of manufacture to a specified width.
  • Flat Cable
    A cable whose conductors run parallel to one another; jacket may be smooth or corrugated, but essentially flat.
  • Flat Conductor
    A wire having a rectangular cross section as opposed to round or square conductors.
  • Flat Conductor Cable
    A cable with a plurality of flat conductors.
  • Flex Life
    The measurement of the ability of a conductor or cable to withstand repeated bending without losing functionality
  • Flexibility
    The ease with which a cable may be bent without sustaining damage.
  • Flexible
    The quality of a cable or cable component which allows for bending under the influence of outside force - as opposed to limpness, which is bending due to the cable's own weight.
  • Flux
    (1) The lines of force which make up an electrostatic field(2) The rate of flow of energy across or through a surface(3) A substance used to promote or facilitate fusion .
  • FR-1
    A flammability rating established by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. for wires and cables that passed a specially-designed vertical flame test. This designation has since been replaced by VW-1
  • Gauge
    Or American Wire Gauge: The standard system used for designating wire diameter.  The lower the AWG, the larger the diameter.  Also called the Brown and Sharpe (B&S) Wire Gauge.
  • GOST
    Approval agency of Russia.
  • Ground
    A conduction connection between an electrical circuit and the earth or other large conduction body to serve as an earth, thus making a complete electrical circuit.
  • Harness
    or Wire Harness: An arrangement of wires and cables, usually with many breakouts, which have been tied together or pulled into a rubber or plastic sheath, used to interconnect an electric circuit.
  • Heat Shrink Tubing
    Thermoplastic tubing that, when subjected to heat, shrinks in diameter and provides insulation to wires, connections, and terminals.  May also be used for wire bundling, identification, and abrasion resistance.
  • Hertz (Hz)
    A term replacing cycles-per-second as an indication of frequency.
  • HETTA-LITE®
    Thin wall, high temperature hookup wire made by Conductive.
  • Hi-Pot Test
    Short for "high potential," a test designed to determine the highest voltage that can be applied to a conductor without breaking through the insulation.
  • Hook-Up Wire
    A single insulated conductor used for low current, low voltage (usually under 600 volts) applications within enclosed electronic equipment.
  • Hospital Only
    A device which is listed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. for use in health care facilities.
  • HPN
    Heater parallel cable.  Two-conductor, neoprene-insulated heater cord, parallel construction.
  • IEC
    International Electrotechnical Commission, a European organization dealing with electrical standards.
  • Impedance
    The total opposition that a circuit offers to the flow of alternating current or any other varying current at a particular frequency.  It is a combination of resistance R and reactance X, measured in ohms.  Symbol:  Z
  • IMQ
    Approval agency of Italy.
  • Inductance
    The property of a circuit or circuit element that opposes a change in current flow, thus causing current changes to lag behind voltage changes. It is measured in henrys (H).  Symbol: L.
  • Insulation
    A material having high resistance to the flow of electric current. Often called a dielectric in radio frequency cable.
  • Insulation Adhesion
    The degree of tightness of the insulation over the base conductor measured in terms of force required to remove a specific length of insulation from the wire.
  • Insulation Crimp
    The area of a terminal, splice, or contact that has been formed around the insulation of the wire, providing additional resistance to mechanical stress.
  • Insulation Grip
    Extended cylinders at the rear or crimp-type contacts designed to accept the bared wire and a small length of its insulation.
  • Insulation Resistance
    That property of an insulating material which resists electrical current flow through the insulating material when a potential difference is applied.
  • Insulation System
    All of the insulation materials used to insulate a particular electrical or electronic product.
  • Internal Wiring
    Electronic wiring which interconnects components, usually within a sealed subsystem.
  • IRAM
    Approval agency of Argentina.
  • IRON-FLEX™
    Specialty cordage designed by Conductive for high performance electric iron applications.
  • Jacket
    An outer, non-metallic protective covering applied over an insulated wire or cable.
  • Jumper
    A short length of conductor used to make a connection between terminals, around a break in a circuit, or around an instrument.
  • KEMA KEUR
    Approval agency of the Netherlands.
  • Lay
    The length measured along the axis of a wire or cable required for a single strand (in stranded wire) or conductor (in cable) to make one complete turn about the axis of the conductor or cable.
  • LCIE
    Approval agency of France.
  • Lead
    A wire, with or without terminals, that connects two points in a circuit.
  • LED
    Abbrevaition for Light-Emitting Diode, used to indicate a device's status
  • Line Voltage
    The value of the potential existing on a supply or power line. Rated voltage of cables.
  • Locking
    A device designed to lock in place when it is rotated in a clockwise direction.  The device can then only be removed when turned in a counterclockwise direction.
  • Marker Tape
    A tape laid parallel to the conductors under the sheath in a cable, imprinted with the manufacturer's name and the specification to which the cable is made.
  • Marking Stripe
    Or Tracing Stripe: A continuous, colored, spiral stripe applied to a conductor for circuit identification.
  • MEDI-FLEX™
    Extreme flexible medical wire made by Conductive.
  • MEDI-TOUGH®
    Heavy duty cabling solution designed by Conductive specifically for harsh medical environments .
  • Moisture Resistance
    The ability of a material to resist absorbing moisture from the air ot when immersed in water.
  • Molded Plug
    A connector molded on either end of a cord or cable.
  • Monomer
    A simple compound of low molecular weight whose molecules can join together to form a polymer.
  • Motor Lead Wire
    Wire which connects to the usually fragile and easily damaged magnet wire found in coils, transformers, and stator or field windings.
  • Multi-Conductor
    More than one conductor within a single cable complex.
  • Mylar®
    High tensile strength/temperature resistant polyester film can be used as cable filler to help with shielding/flexibility.
  • NEMA
    Abbreviation for National Electrical Manufacturers Association.
  • NEMKO
    Approval agency of Norway.
  • Neoprene
    Trade name for polychloroprene, used for jacketing where wire and cable will be subjected to rough usage, moisture, oil, greases, solvents, and chemicals.
  • Ohm
    The SI unit of electrical resistance.
  • Outdoor Rating
    Describes a listed product usable outdoors or in wet locations.
  • Outlet
    A receptacle, especially one mounted in a wall, that is connected to a power supply and equipped with a socket for a plug, at which current is taken to supply electric devices.
  • Overall Diameter (OD)
    Finished diameter of wire or cable.
  • Parallel Pair
    A duplex construction of two insulated conductors laid parallel and then covered overall with a braid or jacket.
  • Parallel Stripe
    A stripe applied longitudinally on a wire or cable parallel to the axis of the conductor.
  • PCB
    Printed Circuit Board, a flat plastic or fiberglass board on which interconnected circuits and components are laminated or etched. Chips and other electronic components are then mounted on the circuits.
  • Pigtail Wire
    Fine stranded, extra flexible, rope lay lead wire attached to a shield for terminating purposes.
  • Plasticizer
    A chemical agent added in compounding plastics to make them softer and more flexible.
  • Plug
    A device attached at the end of a flexible cord with male contacts which, when inserted into a receptacle, establishes connection between the conductors of the attached flexible cord and the conductors attached to the receptacle.
  • Polarization
    The orientation of a flat cable, plug, or connector as to maintain the identity of the neutral conductor in the connected equipment.
  • Polychloroprene
    Or Neoprene: Trade name for polychloroprene, used for jacketing where wire and cable will be subjected to rough usage, moisture, oil, greases, solvents, and chemicals.
  • Polyethylene (PE)
    A family of insulating materials derived from polymerization of ethylene gas.  They are basically pure hydrocarbon resins with excellent dielectric properties.
  • Polymer
    A material of high molecular weight formed by the chemical union of monomers.
  • Polypropylene (PPE)
    A thermoplastic similar to polyethylene but stiffer and having higher softening point (temperature); excellent electrical properties.
  • Polyurethane (PUR)
    Class of polymers known for good abrasion and solvent resistance (may be applied in solid or cellular form).
  • Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)
    A general-purpose thermoplastic widely used for wire and cable insulation and jackets.
  • Power Cables
    Cables of various sizes, construction, and insulation, single or multi-conductor, designed to distribute primary power to various types of equipment.
  • POWER-TOUGH®
    Heavy duty cordage made by Conductive and designed for industrial use and power tools.
  • PTFE
    Abbreviation for Polytetrafluoroethylene.
  • PVC
    Or Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC): A general-purpose thermoplastic widely used for wire and cable insulation and jackets.
  • Rated Voltage
    The maximum voltage at which an electric component can operate for extended periods of time without risk of undue degradation or safety hazard.
  • Receptacle
    A receptacle is a device that supplies power to an electrical load through a cord and plug.
  • Resistance
    A measure of the difficulty in moving electrical current through a medium when voltage is applied. It is measured in ohms.
  • Ring Tongue
    A solder-less terminal that connects wire to a stud.
  • Rip-Cord
    (1) Two or more insulated conductors in a parallel configuration which may be separated to leave the insulation of each conductor intact(2) A small filament cord used to rip through the outer cable sheath.
  • Rubber
    A general term used to describe wire insulation and jackets made of thermosetting elastomers, such as natural or synthetic rubbers, EPR, or neoprene.
  • S
    Extra hard service cable, rubber-insulated conductors and jacket, 600V.
  • SAE
    Society of Automotive Engineers.
  • Semi-conductor
    A substance with electrical conductivity intermediate between that of an insulator and a conductor. An integrated circuit or other electronic component containing a semiconductor as a base material.
  • SEMKO
    Approval agency of Sweden.
  • Separator
    A layer of insulating material that is placed between a conductor and its dielectric, between a cable jacket and the components it covers, or between various components of a multiple-conductor cable.
  • Sheath
    The material, usually an extruded plastic or elastomer, applied outermost to a wire or cable. Very often referred to as a jacket.
  • Shunt Wire
    A conductor joining two parts of an electric circuit to divert part of the current.
  • SI
    Abbreviation for the International System of Units, the primary system of measurement for commerce and science.
  • Silicone
    A material made from silicone and oxygen that can be in thermosetting elastomer or liquid form.  The thermosetting elastomer form is noted for its high heat resistance.
  • SJ
    Junior hard service cable, rubber-insulated conductors and jacket, 300V.
  • SJE
    Junior hard service cable, thermoplastic elastomer-insulated conductors and jacket, 300V.
  • SJEO
    Same as SJE but with oil-resistant jacket, 300V.
  • SJEOOW
    Same as SJE but with oil-resistant jacket, oil-resistant insulation, and rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJEOW
    Same as SJE but with oil-resistant jacket and rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJEW
    Same as SJE but rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJO
    Same as SJ but with oil-resistant jacket, 300V.
  • SJOO
    Same as SJ but with oil-resistant jacket and oil-resistant insulation, 300V.
  • SJOOW
    Same as SJ but with oil-resistant jacket, oil-resistant insulation, and rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJT
    Junior hard service cable, thermoplastic-insulated conductors and jacket, 300V.
  • SJTO
    Same as SJT but with oil-resistant jacket, 300V.
  • SJTOO
    Same as SJT but with oil-resistant jacket and oil-resistant insulation, 300V.
  • SJTOOW
    Same as SJT but with oil-resistant jacket, oil-resistant insulation, and rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJTOW
    Same as SJT but with oil-resistant jacket and rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • SJTW
    Same as SJT but rated for outdoor use, 300V.
  • Sleeve
    A braided, knifed, or woven tube used over wires or components as insulation tubing.  Also called Sleeving.
  • SO
    Same as S but with oil-resistant jacket, 600V.
  • Solid Conductor
    A conductor consisting of a single wire.
  • SOO
    Same as S but with oil-resistant jacket and oil-resistant insulation, 600V.
  • SOOW
    Same as S but with oil-resistant jacket, oil-resistant insulation, and rated for outdoor use, 600V.
  • SOW
    Same as S but with oil-resistant jacket and rated for outdoor use, 600V.
  • SP-1
    Service parallel cable.  All rubber, parallel-jacketed, two-conductor light duty cord for pendant or portable use in damp locations. 300V.
  • SP-2
    Same as SP-1, but heavier construction, with or without third conductor for grounding purposes. 300V.
  • SP-3
    Same as SP-2, but heavier construction for refrigerators or room air conditioners. 300V.
  • Spark Test
    A test designed to locate pin-holes in an insulated wire by application of an electrical potential across the material for a very short period of time while the wire is drawn through an electrode field.
  • Specific Gravity
    The ratio of the weight of any volume of substance to a weight of an equal volume of some substance taken as a standard, usually water for liquids and hydrogen for gases.
  • Spiral Wrap
    A term given to describe the helical wrap of a tape or thread over a core.
  • Splice
    A joint used for connecting two lengths of conductor or cable with good mechanical strength as well as good conductivity.
  • SPT-1
    Service parallel thermoplastic cable.  Same as SP-1, except all-thermoplastic.  300V.  With or without third conductor for grounding.
  • SPT-2
    Same as SP-2, except all-thermoplastic.  300V.  With or without third conductor for grounding.
  • SPT-3
    Same as SP-3, except all thermoplastic.  300V.  With or without third conductor for grounding.
  • SRD
    Portable range or dryer cable. Three or four rubber-insulated conductors with rubber or neoprene jacket, flat or round construction. 300V, 60°C.
  • SRDT
    Same as SRD except all-thermoplastic construction with a maximum temperature of 90°C.
  • ST
    Extra hard service cable, thermoplastic-insulated conductors and jacket, 600V.
  • STO
    Same as ST but with oil-resistant jacket, 600V.
  • STOO
    Same as ST but with oil-resistant jacket and oil-resistant insulation, 600V.
  • STOOW
    Same as ST but with oil-resistant jacket, oil-resistant insulation, and rated for outdoor use, 600V.
  • STOW
    Same as ST but with oil-resistant jacket and rated for outdoor use, 600V.
  • Strand
    An individual wire within a stranded conductor.
  • Strand Lay
    A distance of advance of one strand of a spirally stranded conductor, in one turn, measured axially.
  • Stranded Conductor
    A conductor composed of a group of twisted wires.
  • Strip
    To remove insulation from a wire or cable, exposing the conductors.
  • STW
    Same as ST but rated for outdoor use, 600V.
  • SV
    Service vacuum thermoplastic cable.  Vacuum cleaner cord, two or three conductor, rubber insulated and jacketed.  For light duty in damp locations, 300V.
  • Tape Wrap
    A tape laid spirally over an insulated or uninsulated wire.
  • Tensile Strength
    The pull stress required to break a given specimen.
  • Terminals
    Metal wire termination devices designed to handle one or more conductors, and to be attached to a board bus or block with mechanical fasteners or clipped on.
  • Thermoplastic
    A classification of resin that can be repeatedly softened and reformed by a process heating and rehardened by cooling.
  • Thermoset
    A material which permanently hardens or sets when heated or cured.  Once hardened, thermoset materials cannot be re-softened by heating.
  • THHN
    Nylon-jacketed, thermoplastic-insulated building wire rated for dry locations,  90°C, 600V.
  • Three-Phase Current
    Current delivered through three wires, with each wire serving as a return for the other two.
  • Three-Phase Three-Wire System
    An alternating current supply system comprising three conductors over which three-phase power is sent.
  • Three-Wire System
    A DC or single-phase AC system comprising three conductors, one of which is maintained at a potential midway between the potential of the other two.
  • THW
    Thermoplastic-insulated building wire, flame retardant, moisture and heat-resistant, 75°C, 600V.
  • THWN
    Nylon-jacketed, thermoplastic-insulated building wire rated for wet locations, 75°C, 600V.
  • Tinning
    The process of passing or dipping bare wire through a bath of molten tin to provide a tinned coating.
  • Tinsel Wire
    A low voltage, stranded wire where each strand is a very thin conductor ribbon spirally wrapped around a textile yarn. Insulation is generally a textile braid. Intended usage is for severe flexing.
  • Tracing Stripe
    A continuous, colored, spiral stripe applied to a conductor for circuit identification.
  • Tubing
    A tube of extruded non-supported plastic or metallic material.
  • TW
    Thermoplastic insulated building wire, moisture-resistant, 60°C, 600V.
  • UL
    Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the approval agency for the United States.
  • Unilay Strand
    A conductor constructed with a central core surrounded by more than one layer of helically-laid wires, with all layers having a common length and direction of lay.
  • VACUUMFLEX®
    Specialty cordage for the vacuum cleaner industry made by Conductive.
  • VDE
    Approval agency of Germany.
  • Velocity of Propagation (VP)
    The speed of an electrical signal down a length of cable compared to speed in free space expressed as a percent. It is the reciprocal of the square root of the dielectric constant of the cable insulation.
  • Volt
    The standard unit of electromotive force or electrical pressure. One volt is the amount of pressure that will cause one ampere of current to flow through one ohm of resistance.
  • Voltage
    The term most often used in place of electromotive force, potential difference or voltage drop to designate the electric pressure that exists between two points and is capable of producing a current when a closed circuit is connected between two points.
  • Voltage Drop
    The voltage developed across a component or conductor by the current in the resistance or impedance of the component or conductor.
  • Voltage Rating
    (1) The highest voltage that can be continuously applied to a wire in conformance with the standard or specification( 2) The system voltage printed on the wire or cable.
  • Vulcanization
    A chemical reaction in which the physical properties of an elastomer are changed by reacting it with sulfur or other cross-linking agents.
  • VUURGUARD®-150
    High temperature, VW-1 hookup wire made by Conductive.
  • VW-1
    A flammability rating established by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. for wires and cables that pass a specially designed vertical flame test.  Formerly designated FR-1.
  • Wall Thickness
    The thickness of the insulation or jacket.
  • Watt
    A unit of electrical power.
  • Wire
    (1) A single piece of slender, flexible metal ranging in approximate size from a piece that is difficult to bend by hand to a fine thread (2) Several wires (as in 1) twisted together (3) Wires (as in 1 or 2) that are insulated.
  • Wire Gauge
    Or American Wire Gauge: The standard system used for designating wire diameter.  The lower the AWG, the larger the diameter.  Also called the Brown and Sharpe (B&S) Wire Gauge.
  • Wire Harness
    An arrangement of wires and cables, usually with many breakouts, which have been tied together or pulled into a rubber or plastic sheath, used to interconnect an electric circuit.
  • Wire Marker
    Identification marking of wire and cable.
  • XLPE
    Cross-linked polyethylene.
  • Yield Strength
    The minimum stress at which a material will start to physically deform without further increase in load.
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